Multilevel marketing (MLM) is, strictly speaking, not marketing at all but a form of direct sales with special features, of which recruiting is fundamental. A person, recruited by the company to sell a product, earns commissions; if that person recruits others, this second layer is called the person's "downline." The person earns a cut on the sales of people in the downline, called an "override." But those in the second level may also recruit others and create their own "downlines." The first person in the chain gets an "override" from every level, however many there may be, although always less the farther removed the source is. Often recruits are required to purchase an initial "starting inventory" of the product. In many cases the MLM company will not repurchase this inventory or will do so at a very reduced price. These characteristics have caused MLM to be associated with pyramid schemes; and some technically are such schemes. Not surprisingly, reputable direct marketing companies and the associations to which they belong are continuously engaged in policing the field and in advocating legislation aimed at setting clear and unambiguous rules. The term "network marketing" is in part used because "multi-level" marketing has at best an ambiguous reputation.

When someone gets pitched to join an MLM, the recruiting distributor will do what’s called “selling the dream.” They’ll emphasize all the money you can make working as a distributor. They’ll share video testimonials of a distributor talking about how they paid off their loans and bought a nice car and take their families on nice vacations every year. (Watch this soaring, inspirational video, and notice how you’ll have to keep reminding yourself: this is a pitch for an essentials oils MLM.) The pitchman will have charts that show the earning potential once you recruit a certain amount of people. And best of all, they’ll tell you that this beaucoup income is passive. Yeah, you’ll have to work a lot in the beginning, but you’ll eventually reach a point when money just appears in your bank account magically without you having to do anything.

“Joining an MLM is appealing to women who find hope in their promises of a better life: freedom, economic independence, and an endless supply of cheery trinkets. Despite professing quick-income prospects though, it’s difficult for MLM consultants to earn more than pocket change. When glitzy recruitment videos yield to the reality of suburban cul-de-sacs, people selling for MLMs can be plunged into debt and psychological crisis.” (Quartz)


I tried this product for an entire month. I do not feel any different. It did not reduce my anxiety at all. At one point I even doubled the dose. I felt no reduction in anxiety symptoms. The only effect I felt was being tired. Within an hour I was out cold. I suppose you could consider that taking care of my anxiety sleeping it away. I could accomplish that with Benadryl though or a couple shots of Whiskey. This product also made my tongue numb. So I question if the fatigue like symptom was actually an allergy. I was really hopeful this would be an answer. Also about two weeks in this product took on a smell. This product was stored properly. I may try another line but I wont be buying this brand again. 2 stars bc it arrived pretty much instantly...about a day and a half after ordering.
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